For beginner

If you have set your WordPress site to display post excerpts on the front or home page, you will want visitors to click on the title or a link to encourage them to continue reading your post or article, right? WordPress makes this technique easy, and customizable.

The Excerpt Basics

Excerpts (teasers) can be shown on WordPress through two methods:

  • The first, keeping the the_content() template tag and inserting a quicktag called more at your desired “cut-off” point when editing the post.

In both cases, if you have set anything in the Excerpt meta box on the post editor screen, that text will be used. Otherwise, the excerpt will be automatically trimmed.

The most commonly used method is the first one, because the user editing the post can choose between showing the whole content or just the excerpt, individually for each post. However, using the_excerpt() in your template file can also get a teaser from the first 55 words of the post content, without the need to place a more quicktag in the post.

To add a more quicktag in your post, put your cursor where you want to end the excerpted content of your post and click the more quicktag button. quicktagsare the little buttons found above the editing window in your Administration > Post > Add New Post. They include bolditalic, links, and others, and the famous more.

Current versions of WordPress now have image alignment built-in. WordPress adds CSS classes to align the image to the right, left, and center of a paragraph, so the text will wrap around the image.

Important Theme Code

In order to take advantage of these new CSS classes for image alignment and the text wrapping around the image, the WordPress Theme must include the following in the style.css found in the WordPress Theme directory.

img.alignright { float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; }
img.alignleft { float: left; margin: 0 1em 1em 0; }
img.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }
.alignright { float: right; }
.alignleft { float: left; }
.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }

When adding the image in your WordPress blog, select the image alignment as right, left, or center in the Image/Media Panel.

The image will be embedded into your blog post with the selected style for alignment such as:

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" 
class="alignright size-medium wp-image-3109" 
height="25" width="30"/>

Image Style

leaf.gif

There are times when you want an image on your post to fill the screen, or sit in the middle of text with writing above and below it, but most of the time you want your image to sit on one side or the other of the text and have the text flow or wrap around the image. While the styles above will float the image left and right, you may want to add more design elements to your image.

Let’s start from the beginning with a simple guide to using images in your WordPress blog.

First, here is a look at a typical image tag in your post, without the instructions for wrapping the text around the image. Note that we’ve added both the title and alt attributes to the tag; alt is important for accessibility, title is for the image tooltip.

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" />

To begin the process of setting your image up to be wrapped, there are a few changes that you may need to make to the style sheet that controls your WordPress site. CSS offers a great list of resources for creating and editing Cascading Style Sheets.

From your WordPress Theme folder, open the style.css file in a text-editor. Important! Save a back up copy somewhere before you do any edits! Now, do a search for img. Hopefully, all your image selectors will be grouped together. If not, find them all and cut and paste them into one group to make this process easier.

WordPress makes it easy to style your WordPress site with Themes, many of which are tested thoroughly on different computers and browsers before being released. These are designed for the screen. But what about having your WordPress site designed for print? Some people still like to print out web pages and read them at their leisure, so consider designing your WordPress site for print.

By default, when a user prints a WordPress web page that is not designed with printing in mind, the style sheet is stripped away and the page prints as if there is no style sheet. It tends to look like a long line of information beginning with your header, the content, then the long list that is your sidebar, then footer. Not very pretty.

To see what your WordPress site looks like for printing, print out a page or, from your browser’s menu, choose Print > Print Preview. Not very pretty, is it? And fairly wasteful of paper having that long list of sidebar blogroll links printing out over two pages.

Pretty to Print

To make your site pretty to print, we need to focus on the architecture of the site, the structure that holds the content within each section. Luckily, WordPress Themes’ modular file system tends to make this process much easier, since major structural areas are clearly designated.

The core structure for most WordPress sites is as follows, though the names may be different on your Theme.

#header
#content
#comments
#sidebar (or #menu)
#footer

You will find the styles for these sections in your style.css style sheet in your WordPress Theme folder.

How you change these sections in preparation for printing is up to you. You can still print the sidebar but not the footer, or include the footer but not the sidebar, change font styles and sizes, or even tell it to print images or not. We will give you some examples and the rest you can figure out on your own by experimenting.

For advanced

If you have set your WordPress site to display post excerpts on the front or home page, you will want visitors to click on the title or a link to encourage them to continue reading your post or article, right? WordPress makes this technique easy, and customizable.

The Excerpt Basics

Excerpts (teasers) can be shown on WordPress through two methods:

  • The first, keeping the the_content() template tag and inserting a quicktag called more at your desired “cut-off” point when editing the post.

In both cases, if you have set anything in the Excerpt meta box on the post editor screen, that text will be used. Otherwise, the excerpt will be automatically trimmed.

The most commonly used method is the first one, because the user editing the post can choose between showing the whole content or just the excerpt, individually for each post. However, using the_excerpt() in your template file can also get a teaser from the first 55 words of the post content, without the need to place a more quicktag in the post.

To add a more quicktag in your post, put your cursor where you want to end the excerpted content of your post and click the more quicktag button. quicktagsare the little buttons found above the editing window in your Administration > Post > Add New Post. They include bolditalic, links, and others, and the famous more.

Current versions of WordPress now have image alignment built-in. WordPress adds CSS classes to align the image to the right, left, and center of a paragraph, so the text will wrap around the image.

Important Theme Code

In order to take advantage of these new CSS classes for image alignment and the text wrapping around the image, the WordPress Theme must include the following in the style.css found in the WordPress Theme directory.

img.alignright { float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; }
img.alignleft { float: left; margin: 0 1em 1em 0; }
img.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }
.alignright { float: right; }
.alignleft { float: left; }
.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }

When adding the image in your WordPress blog, select the image alignment as right, left, or center in the Image/Media Panel.

The image will be embedded into your blog post with the selected style for alignment such as:

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" 
class="alignright size-medium wp-image-3109" 
height="25" width="30"/>

Image Style

leaf.gif

There are times when you want an image on your post to fill the screen, or sit in the middle of text with writing above and below it, but most of the time you want your image to sit on one side or the other of the text and have the text flow or wrap around the image. While the styles above will float the image left and right, you may want to add more design elements to your image.

Let’s start from the beginning with a simple guide to using images in your WordPress blog.

First, here is a look at a typical image tag in your post, without the instructions for wrapping the text around the image. Note that we’ve added both the title and alt attributes to the tag; alt is important for accessibility, title is for the image tooltip.

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" />

To begin the process of setting your image up to be wrapped, there are a few changes that you may need to make to the style sheet that controls your WordPress site. CSS offers a great list of resources for creating and editing Cascading Style Sheets.

From your WordPress Theme folder, open the style.css file in a text-editor. Important! Save a back up copy somewhere before you do any edits! Now, do a search for img. Hopefully, all your image selectors will be grouped together. If not, find them all and cut and paste them into one group to make this process easier.

WordPress makes it easy to style your WordPress site with Themes, many of which are tested thoroughly on different computers and browsers before being released. These are designed for the screen. But what about having your WordPress site designed for print? Some people still like to print out web pages and read them at their leisure, so consider designing your WordPress site for print.

By default, when a user prints a WordPress web page that is not designed with printing in mind, the style sheet is stripped away and the page prints as if there is no style sheet. It tends to look like a long line of information beginning with your header, the content, then the long list that is your sidebar, then footer. Not very pretty.

To see what your WordPress site looks like for printing, print out a page or, from your browser’s menu, choose Print > Print Preview. Not very pretty, is it? And fairly wasteful of paper having that long list of sidebar blogroll links printing out over two pages.

Pretty to Print

To make your site pretty to print, we need to focus on the architecture of the site, the structure that holds the content within each section. Luckily, WordPress Themes’ modular file system tends to make this process much easier, since major structural areas are clearly designated.

The core structure for most WordPress sites is as follows, though the names may be different on your Theme.

#header
#content
#comments
#sidebar (or #menu)
#footer

You will find the styles for these sections in your style.css style sheet in your WordPress Theme folder.

How you change these sections in preparation for printing is up to you. You can still print the sidebar but not the footer, or include the footer but not the sidebar, change font styles and sizes, or even tell it to print images or not. We will give you some examples and the rest you can figure out on your own by experimenting.

For others

If you have set your WordPress site to display post excerpts on the front or home page, you will want visitors to click on the title or a link to encourage them to continue reading your post or article, right? WordPress makes this technique easy, and customizable.

The Excerpt Basics

Excerpts (teasers) can be shown on WordPress through two methods:

  • The first, keeping the the_content() template tag and inserting a quicktag called more at your desired “cut-off” point when editing the post.

In both cases, if you have set anything in the Excerpt meta box on the post editor screen, that text will be used. Otherwise, the excerpt will be automatically trimmed.

The most commonly used method is the first one, because the user editing the post can choose between showing the whole content or just the excerpt, individually for each post. However, using the_excerpt() in your template file can also get a teaser from the first 55 words of the post content, without the need to place a more quicktag in the post.

To add a more quicktag in your post, put your cursor where you want to end the excerpted content of your post and click the more quicktag button. quicktagsare the little buttons found above the editing window in your Administration > Post > Add New Post. They include bolditalic, links, and others, and the famous more.

Current versions of WordPress now have image alignment built-in. WordPress adds CSS classes to align the image to the right, left, and center of a paragraph, so the text will wrap around the image.

Important Theme Code

In order to take advantage of these new CSS classes for image alignment and the text wrapping around the image, the WordPress Theme must include the following in the style.css found in the WordPress Theme directory.

img.alignright { float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; }
img.alignleft { float: left; margin: 0 1em 1em 0; }
img.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }
.alignright { float: right; }
.alignleft { float: left; }
.aligncenter { display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }

When adding the image in your WordPress blog, select the image alignment as right, left, or center in the Image/Media Panel.

The image will be embedded into your blog post with the selected style for alignment such as:

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" 
class="alignright size-medium wp-image-3109" 
height="25" width="30"/>

Image Style

leaf.gif

There are times when you want an image on your post to fill the screen, or sit in the middle of text with writing above and below it, but most of the time you want your image to sit on one side or the other of the text and have the text flow or wrap around the image. While the styles above will float the image left and right, you may want to add more design elements to your image.

Let’s start from the beginning with a simple guide to using images in your WordPress blog.

First, here is a look at a typical image tag in your post, without the instructions for wrapping the text around the image. Note that we’ve added both the title and alt attributes to the tag; alt is important for accessibility, title is for the image tooltip.

<img src="http://example.com/images/leaf.jpg" 
 alt="leaf graphic" 
 title="leaf graphic" />

To begin the process of setting your image up to be wrapped, there are a few changes that you may need to make to the style sheet that controls your WordPress site. CSS offers a great list of resources for creating and editing Cascading Style Sheets.

From your WordPress Theme folder, open the style.css file in a text-editor. Important! Save a back up copy somewhere before you do any edits! Now, do a search for img. Hopefully, all your image selectors will be grouped together. If not, find them all and cut and paste them into one group to make this process easier.

WordPress makes it easy to style your WordPress site with Themes, many of which are tested thoroughly on different computers and browsers before being released. These are designed for the screen. But what about having your WordPress site designed for print? Some people still like to print out web pages and read them at their leisure, so consider designing your WordPress site for print.

By default, when a user prints a WordPress web page that is not designed with printing in mind, the style sheet is stripped away and the page prints as if there is no style sheet. It tends to look like a long line of information beginning with your header, the content, then the long list that is your sidebar, then footer. Not very pretty.

To see what your WordPress site looks like for printing, print out a page or, from your browser’s menu, choose Print > Print Preview. Not very pretty, is it? And fairly wasteful of paper having that long list of sidebar blogroll links printing out over two pages.

Pretty to Print

To make your site pretty to print, we need to focus on the architecture of the site, the structure that holds the content within each section. Luckily, WordPress Themes’ modular file system tends to make this process much easier, since major structural areas are clearly designated.

The core structure for most WordPress sites is as follows, though the names may be different on your Theme.

#header
#content
#comments
#sidebar (or #menu)
#footer

You will find the styles for these sections in your style.css style sheet in your WordPress Theme folder.

How you change these sections in preparation for printing is up to you. You can still print the sidebar but not the footer, or include the footer but not the sidebar, change font styles and sizes, or even tell it to print images or not. We will give you some examples and the rest you can figure out on your own by experimenting.